so the intro to my literary theory textbook talks about the jerks in academia who like to wear their asses as hats and uses the example of a student who didn’t know what the phrase “the death of the author” referred to and was too afraid to ask within the contexts they had previously heard it, because academia asshats

and when my professor was discussing the same thing on the first day of class, he did the same fucking thing. he was like “right, like this “death of the author” thing?” (obvi in reference to the example in the textbook) and a few people nodded their heads and he just continued talking even though he knew because he’d asked that most of the people in the room hadn’t done the reading because the school switch to a new email database confused EVERYONE and a lot of people still hadn’t accessed their new email accounts so they didn’t receive the message about the assignment

like i had no idea what that phrase meant either until i started reading the textbook. admittedly, i had no idea what most of the things he was talking about were, because he was doing the same shit that the author of our textbook criticizes for like ten pages

letterstomycountry:

hipsterlibertarian:

setbabiesonfire:

cyclivist:

Deputy who killed former Napster COO after drifting into the bike lane while distracted by his laptop will not face charges because he was answering a work-related email.

OH OKAY.

I accidentally killed someone, you guys, but I was just doing research for an article I’m writing, so that makes it ok. That’s how it works, right?

LTMC: Meanwhile, 16-year olds get prosecuted for manslaughter for texting while driving.  But don’t worry, police don’t get special treatment.

letterstomycountry:

hipsterlibertarian:

setbabiesonfire:

cyclivist:

Deputy who killed former Napster COO after drifting into the bike lane while distracted by his laptop will not face charges because he was answering a work-related email.

OH OKAY.

I accidentally killed someone, you guys, but I was just doing research for an article I’m writing, so that makes it ok. That’s how it works, right?

LTMC: Meanwhile, 16-year olds get prosecuted for manslaughter for texting while driving.  But don’t worry, police don’t get special treatment.

(via bvcklessblvckdress)

  • JESSE EISENBERG: People on the street say mean things to me.
  • INTERVIEWER: Like what?
  • JESSE EISENBERG: I get called Napoleon Dynamite because I have curly hair. I live in New York City and I ride a bicycle. I always bike down 9th Avenue and there’s this kid who goes to school there named Abraham. Every time I pass him, he calls me Napoleon Dynamite. He screams it out and his friends laugh. That was a fine movie but I wasn’t in it.
  • INTERVIEWER: What do you say back?
  • JESSE EISENBERG: I say, “Please, Abraham, I’m not that man.”

policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
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policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info
policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.
And people are paying attention. 
Read more | Follow policymic
Zoom Info

policymic:

Kehinde Wiley is turning art history on its head — and every 20-something art lover should know his name

Born in Los Angeles in 1977, the African-American artist works within the boundaries set by the Old European portrait masters like Titian. Wiley’s twist is that he frames the black cultural experience within the pomp, majesty and enormous gilded frames of white art history.

And people are paying attention. 

Read more | Follow policymic

(via feelknower1993)